Archived TRIPTAC Trainings


During the TRIPTAC's existence (2009-2014) the team developed and lead trainings on many topics related to Alternative Transportation Systems. The page provides an archive (in both pdf and streaming format) of the trainings created by the TRIPTAC.




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Module 1 - The Role of Alternative Transportation Systems in National Park and Federal Lands for Enhancing Visitor Experiences and Preserving Resources (completed fall 2010)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming)
Handouts: Transportation Planning Process for Transit in FLMAs

The goals of this module are to 1) introduce participants to the critical transportation-related concerns and considerations faced by federal land management agencies (FLMAs) and gateway communities, 2) describe how these concerns affect visitors’ experiences and the unit resources, 3) outline the different alternative transportation systems options available to planners, 4) provide participants with a framework for evaluating alternative transportation systems, and 5) prepare participants for the rest of the module series. In order to accomplish these goals, this module is structured as follows: First, we will present the transportation issues associated with federal lands and surrounding areas. Next, we will discuss how these issues affect visitors’ behaviors and experiences as well as unit resources. Finally, we will explain how to address these issues (and, in turn, visitor behavior/ experiences and unit resources) through the use of alternative transportation systems.

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Module 2 – Framing the Need for Transportation Improvements (completed spring 2010)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming)
Handouts: Transportation Planning Process for Transit in FLMAs

This module has been designed to teach participants how to establish goals, objectives, and performance measures that will enable them to accomplish the planning and implementation of an ATS and identify the data that will be required for that effort. The key points will include: (1) Overview of Transportation Planning Process, (2) Assessing the Need for Improved Transportation in a FLMA Unit, (3) Developing Goals, Objectives and Performance Measures, (4) Participant Interactive Exercise – Developing Goals, Objectives and Performance Measures, and (5) Supporting Goals, Objectives and Performance Measures Through Data Collection.

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Module 4 – Alternative Transportation Systems (ATS) and the Role of Partnerships, Stakeholder Participation, and Public Involvement (completed fall 2010)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming)
Interviews: Paul Murphy (streaming)

This introductory training webinar will describe partnerships and explain why agencies MUST partner to ensure the success of alternative transportation system (ATS) planning projects. The training will offer an exploration of the steps involved in developing partnerships, discuss the benefits of partnering, and identify the essential elements of sustaining good working relations with partners. Different public involvement mechanisms will be explored for planning and its relation to partnerships. Additionally, participants will learn ways that other land managers have been successfully partnering on ATS projects and discuss the process and benefits of putting together various partnership agreements.

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Module 7 – Cost Estimating and Financial Sustainability Analysis (completed summer 2010)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming)
Handouts: Transportation Planning Process for Transit in FLMAs

Participants of this online, interactive webinar will learn the techniques used to analyze and determine the financial sustainability of a project including determining the costs of a project over time and assessing the potential revenues available from a range of potential funding sources. Participants will learn how the choice of a service delivery strategy can impact the financial requirements for projects. The key points of this training are: (1) Overview of service delivery options and their impacts on costs, (2) Methods for estimating costs of planning, design and construction of improvements, (3) Methods for estimating operating and maintenance costs, (4) Methods to estimate major overhaul and replacement requirements and costs, (5) Estimating life-cycle costs, (6) Identifying potential funding sources, (7) Projecting revenues over time, and (8) Assessing financial sustainability.

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Transit Vehicle Alternative Fuels Cost Benefit Analysis (completed winter 2011)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming)
Handouts: Activating Macros (pdf)

This training webinar introduces users to the analysis and evaluation of alternative fuel options for mass transit investments. The training offers an explanation of the required steps to conduct a life-cycle analysis for fuel fleet purchasing decisions. Participants will learn how to compare the costs and benefits associated with the implementation of transit vehicles using alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, compress natural gas, and hybrid-electric buses.

Users will learn how to use BuFFeT© (Bus Fuel Fleet Evaluation Tool), a sketch-planning application specifically designed to evaluate alternative fuel options for transit. Using a simple example, participants will learn to run the application to gain an understanding of what the model does and how to interpret results it produces.

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Paul S. Sarbanes Transit in Parks Grant Writing Training (completed winter 2011)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming - 3/17/2011)
Handouts: Contact Handout (pdf)

This training webinar will describe the types of information that should be included in a Paul S. Sarbanes Transit in Parks application and provide general grant proposal writing tips. The key points for this training will include: (1) An overview of the Transit in Parks program including eligibility, criteria, and submission information (2) Examples for how to address the criteria for an implementation grant (3) Examples for how to address the criteria for a planning grant (4) proposal writing tips.

This event is free and is geared mainly toward unit-level Federal Land Management Agency personnel and their partners who intend to apply for a Paul S. Sarbanes Transit in Parks Grant for alternative transportation planning and implementation projects. All Federal Land Management Agency personnel, as well as local community partners, are welcome to attend.

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TRIPTAC Northeast Regional Workshop and Webinar (completed fall 2011)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming - TRIPTAC Overview)
Handouts: Agenda (pdf)

The session will provide an overview of the role the transportation sector plays in producing greenhouse gas emissions, environmental best practices transportation providers can adopt to reduce these emissions, examples of best practices currently being used in and around public lands, and potential means for encouraging best practices in and around federal lands, including ecolabels and the University of Vermont’s green certification program for passenger transportation. You will also learn about resources offered by TRIPTAC, and how you can take advantage of our free transportation-related technical assistance. You will learn how to navigate the TRIPTAC website, which is a rapidly growing resource for transportation news and information. The main objectives of this presentation and webinar are to: (1) Examine the impacts of the U.S. transportation sector on global greenhouse gas emissions, with an emphasis on passenger transportation services; (2) Highlight alternative transportation strategies currently in use on federal lands including national parks, national forests, wildlife refuges, national monuments, recreation areas, and wilderness areas; (3) Discuss methods for encouraging emission reduction strategies and reducing other environmental impacts of the transportation sector, focusing on ecolabels; (4) Review a case study of the Green Coach Certification Pilot Program and introduce the Sustainable Transportation Certification program being launched this fall by the University of Vermont; and (5) Collect input on strategies for encouraging the adoption of environmental best practices for transportation providers in and around federal lands.

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Wildlife Resource Protection on Traveled Federal Lands (completed fall 2011)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming)
Handouts: References (pdf)

The main objective of this training is to give natural resource agency professionals an expanded view of wildlife-transportation interactions and what they can do about mitigating negative effects on traveled federal lands. The key points of the training will include: (1) An overview of the ways road infrastructure and traffic can negatively affect mammals, birds, herpetiles, and fish; (2) How to employ the ROCS (Roadkill Observation Collection; (3) System) to standardize data collection and wildlife reporting websites to engage the public; (4) The need for habitat connectivity and genetic exchange; and questions to think about when planning, designing and monitoring wildlife crossing structures; (5) Rethinking what’s possible; and lessons learned from the ARC International Wildlife Crossing Infrastructure Design Competition.

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Bus and Ferry Life Cycle Cost Model for FLMAs (completed fall 2011)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming)
Handouts: Bus Lifecycle Cost Model for FLMAs User Guide (pdf)

The main objective of this training is to teach FLMAs about the effects of various factors on the life cycle costs of buses and ferries, and to enable FLMAs to select the alternative transportation services that are best suited to their needs and their funds available.

The key points of the training will include: (1) General introduction to the full life cycle costs of an alternative transportation service; (2) Description of the inputs to both the bus and ferry models; (3) Demonstration of how the models work, including the tradeoffs associated with altering certain factors; and (4) Step-by-step examples of each model.

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Exploring Bicycle Options for Federal Lands: Bike Sharing, Rentals and Employee Fleets (completed spring 2012)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming)
Handouts: Public Bike Sharing Programs/Bike Rentals: Ten Key Questions (pdf)

This training explores three options for making bicycles more readily available in Federal lands; public bicycle sharing systems, bicycle rental programs, and employee bicycle fleets. Case studies from various locations are presented, including three from NPS unit personnel.

This course helps participants determine which bike programs may best suit their needs and provide planning resources. It is intended for public lands and gateway community transportation and recreation planners, bike share program operators, bike rental shop operators, Federal lands concessionaires, health promotion coordinators and others with an interest in integrating bicycles into daily routines.

The key points of the training include: (1) overview of how bike programs can benefit FLMAs; (2) demonstrate ways that FLMAs have implemented bike sharing, rentals and employee bike fleets into their everyday operations; (3) identify characteristics of places that support public bike sharing systems; (4) identify business models and funding sources for bike programs in Federal lands; (5) understand how bike programs address legal liability, safety issues, and helmet use; (6) explore how elements of successful bike sharing and rental programs may be adapted or combined for Federal lands settings; (7) learn about resources available to plan for bike friendly places and programs.

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Introduction to Alternative Transportation Systems Planning for Federal Land Management Agencies (completed fall 2012)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming)
Handouts: Presenter Biography (pdf)

The U.S. federal lands, among the country's greatest resources and treasures, are highly desirable visitor destinations. Unfortunately, high visitor demand at several Federal Land Management Areas (FLMAs) threatens to degrade both the natural and cultural resources and the visitor experience. During peak visitation periods, many FLMAs experience congested roads and insufficient parking, which can deter visitors from enjoying resources and are potentially harmful to the FLMAs. There are many different approaches to addressing transportation issues on federal lands. Some FLMAs are considering alternative transportation options such as transit, bicycling and other non-auto based transportation options as a means to improve access to and within the FLMA, to reduce the impacts associated with private vehicles, and to improve the visitor experience. Land management staff at a unit are often called upon to lead a transportation planning effort at their unit even though transportation planning is an area in which they have little training or experience.

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Good Practices to Encourage Bicycling & Pedestrians on Federal Lands (completed fall 2012)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming)
Handouts: Good Practices to Encourage Bicycling & Pedestrians on Federal Lands Executive Summary (pdf)

Integrating bicycle and pedestrian systems into transportation networks can help Federal land managers promote resource protection, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, further ecological balance, achieve financial sustainability, and improve visitor enjoyment and health. This training discusses the eleven components of an effective bicycle and pedestrian plan, which were identified from reviewing numerous existing plans within federal lands as well as other locations. Within each component, real world examples are provided. Federal land managers may adapt any of these examples for their unit and/or integrate components into their own plans. This course will provide participants with success stories based on planning experiences at various federal land units, including first-hand accounts from three agency and partner organization staff. The training is intended for Federal lands staff and their partners (such as gateway communities, friends groups, bike advocacy groups, etc.) interested in planning for non-motorized use and access facilities in and around federal lands. Designed as an introductory training, it will be most useful for those with limited or no transportation planning experience.

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Lowell Streetcar Extension Workshop (completed winter 2013)

Presentations: FTA Presentation Session (pdf)
TRIPTAC Presentation Session (pdf)
Handouts: Agenda and Presenter Biographies (pdf)

This training workshop explores planning, development and operation of streetcar based transit systems. Examples from existing streetcar systems are presented including, the Tucson Modern Streetcar, Downtown Dallas-Oak Cliff Streetcar, and others. The key points of this training include: (1) development approach; (2) project management; (3) project delivery alternatives; (4) managing risk; (5) other technical considerations.

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Wildlife Issues for Transportation Planning on Federal Lands (co-hosted with the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative) (completed winter 2013)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming)

Protected areas are assumed to buffer populations of wild animals from human activities. Federal land managers face tough challenges in maintaining the delicate balance between providing access to visitors and preserving our country’s most precious resources. This webinar will focus on wildlife-transportation conflicts and solutions. It will include a brief review of the new transportation Act’s (Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century or MAP-21) provisions for wildlife and connectivity as well as some recent progress by the Western Governors’ Association (WGA) on providing state- and region-wide wildlife corridors and crucial habitats mapping and information.

The key points of this training include: (1) an overview of the ways road infrastructure and traffic can negatively affect mammals, birds, herpetiles, and fish; (2) a close look at large wildlife-vehicle collisions, their cost-benefits and both proven and potential new solutions for their reduction; (3) the need for habitat connectivity and genetic exchange, and questions to think about when planning, designing and monitoring wildlife crossing structures; (4) a review of MAP-21’s new wildlife and habitat connectivity provisions that are important for federal land managers; (5) an update on the WGA’s wildlife corridors and crucial habitats decision support system that can be used for transportation planning.

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Regional Planning to Provide Underserved Communities Access to Public Lands (completed spring 2013)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming)
Handouts: Presenter Biography (pdf)

Many of the Federal Land Management Agencies have goals to increase the use of Public Lands by underserved communities. This training explores regional planning models, such as FWS’s Minneapolis project; FWS Regional Alternative Transportation Evaluations (RATEs); CAR-LESS CA, and NPS’s “Call to Action”, to accomplish that goal. This course will provide participants with ideas for planning techniques to use in their area.

This course includes first-hand accounts from USDA Forest Service and partner organization staff such as Chico State University and the Volpe Center. The training is intended for Public Lands staff and their partners (such as gateway communities, transportation providers, friends groups, advocacy groups, etc.) interested in regional planning for increased access to and use of Public Lands by underserved communities. Designed as an introductory training, it will be most useful for those with limited or no transportation planning experience.

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Partnering and Paying for Alternative Transportation within and to Public Lands (completed winter 2013)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming)
Handouts: Presenter Biography (pdf)

In this course, participants will gain an understanding of non-Federal sources of funding for alternate transportation systems/projects on Federal lands, while also receiving updated information on the FLTP and FLAP programs. In this course, participants will hear directly from three Federal Land Management Agency personnel who have worked with non-Federal governments and public and private organizations to sustain and implement alternative transportation projects, as well as from a national non-profit foundation.

The key points of the training include: (1) an overview of the FLAP and FLTP programs (Federal funding), application process, and where to get more information; (2) how national foundations and partnerships can support units; (3) specific strategies to consider based on examples of FLMA units working with various funding sources to sustain and/or implement ATS projects.

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Alternative Transportation Systems (ATS) Business Model Selection Guidance (completed spring 2014)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming)
Handouts: Presenter Biographies (pdf)

Alternative Transportation Systems (ATS) operating to and within federal lands, consist of a variety of mobility options that reduce the need for personal auto travel and mitigate the associated impacts on traffic congestion and natural resources. The methods in which ATS are delivered at Federal Land Management Agencies (FLMAs) are categorized into different Business Models. This course is designed for FLMA unit level staff that may play a role in planning or implementation of ATS. It begins by defining the four major Business Models and the associated laws, regulations and policies which govern their use. An analysis of ATS contracts and agreements is presented to illustrate the various Business Models in practice along with FLMA examples including a brief case study of ATS service contracts with the Forest Service at Sabino Canyon (Coronado National Forest). To aid FLMA practitioners, a Business Model selection tree is presented which links to contract template language and model agreements which can be adapted for use in ATS implementation.

The key points of the training include: (1) provide participants with a process to select the appropriate Business Model for ATS based on the most feasible and financially sustainable option; (2) identify arrangements and language in contracts and agreements that minimize risk to FLMAs that provide ATS; (3) illustrate some of the pros and cons of each Business Model type, so that FLMAs can pursue an arrangement that best suits a unit’s particular scenario; (4) convey what is and is not possible with each of the business model contract and agreement types based on law, regulation and policy; (5) provide a meta-analysis of the contracts and agreements that were reviewed to identify trends and prevailing practices.

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TRIPTAC is Closing...So Now What (completed spring 2014)

Presentation: (pdf, streaming)
Handouts: None

For the past 5 years, the TRIPTAC has provided to Federal Land Managers free technical assistance and resources related to Alternative Transportation Systems (ATS). With the closing of TRIPTAC on June 30, 2014, we have tried to ensure that all of the trainings and resources we’ve created in the past 5 years will still be available to Federal Land Managers.

The main objective of this training is to show our clients how to access our products and services after the closing. The key points of the training are to (1) show FLMAs where the TRIPTAC resources will be relocated to, (2) provide a walkthrough of our new website and (3) where to get technical assistance and training post-TRIPTAC.

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Guidebook & Standards: Resources to help solve bicycle & pedestrian challenges on federal lands (computer based training - available fall 2014)

Presentation: (website)
Handouts: (website)

This presentation is intended to help federal land managers gain a familiarity with planning and design guidebooks and standards in order to increase awareness of possible solutions or facilities and enable the federal land managers to communicate more effectively with planners and engineers.

First, you'll be provided with a brief overview of seven guidebooks and standards commonly used in relationship to the design of bicycle and pedestrian facilities. Following the presentation, you will have the opportunity to view a case study which presents some common challenges, and review possible solutions that can be found in the guidebooks and standards.

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